I met Venezuelan trombonist Gregory Boza while hiring musicians for my first gig in Lima, Peru. His contact was given to me by a common friend, also leaving abroad and I couldn´t help thinking how the ups and downs of his native country in recent years impacted the trajectory of many musicians, who are now starting over in different music scenarios. Boza told me his first days in Peru were very hard and that we had to take many under-qualified jobs before being able to get a place as a musician and that competition was very hard. How did he deal with it? With a little help from the Buddhist wisdom. Familiar with the faith for a long time already, since 2018 Boza became a regular practitioner of meditation. According to him, “it helps to focus on the really important things”.

 

(GF) When did you start learning music?

(GB) My contact with music was at the age of 14. In 2008, I started in the National Orchestral System of Youth and Children's Choirs, in Trujillo. Six months later, I moved to Maracaibo and there I went to the Jose Luis Paz Music Conservatory. A year later I entered the Zuliana Youth Rafael Urdaneta Symphony (OSJZRU)), which belonged to the system of orchestras. 2011 the Maracaibo Big Band was created and they invited me to be part of a big band with Andrés Briceño, who regularly offered workshops for drummers in Maracaibo. Roberto Paredes decided to carry on with the big band project and I played with them up to the end of 2017.

 

(GF) And how about your musical references?

(GB) My musical references change according to the challenges that music presents to me, but during my formation years I listened to music from all genres: Mahler, Tchaikovsky, Brahms, pieces for trombone and also a lot of Jazz, Michel Camilo, Pat Metheny, J.J. Johnson among others.

 

(GF) Special highlights?

(GB) 2011 I travelled to Italy to the Bergamo Cultural Festival with the OSJZRU. I had the opportunity to work with great singers, such as Rafael el Brito Chicken, Ilan Chester, among others. Playing symphonic repertoire, I travelled to Caracas and played at the Latin American Trombone Academy, led by Maestro Miguel Sanchez. I travelled many times to Caracas in order to have classes with renowned teachers such as Norman Bolter, Angel Subero and Giovanny Scarpetta. 2012 I decided to move to Caracas and become a regular student at the academy. I had bass trombone classes with Franklin Moreno. I lived there up to the end of 2013.

 

(GF) How about your future projects?

(GB) I am actually starting in a new band. Last June I was invited to become a member of Los Barraza, a well-known Peruvian orchestra. They have a very busy agenda with presentations in different parts of the country and I am very excited about it.


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Written by Geisa Fernandes - Brasil / Rio de Janeiro

The repertoire of this jazz singer and awarded songwriter from Rio de Janeiro reveals influences of Brazilian popular music, the French chanson and Latin American rhythms, but most of all, Geisa Fernandes is a jazz singer. Billie Holiday aficionada (back in college folks used to call her "Lady Doc"), this PhD holder and Comics researcher was a former vocalist of several bands in São Paulo. 

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(GF) How is your songwriting process?

(Rednex) It has been the same as from two decades ago. It starts with an upbeat hookline sung by a toothless 85 year old man who is about to die, followed by a crazy violin with so many notes it has to be recorded at half speed. Last, and very least, we let the woman sing.

(GF) Acid humor has always been a component of Rednex and Manly Man is no exception. How was the video production?

(Rednex) Thanks for the phrase "acid humor" :) love it! The main songwriter of the track, Janne Eriksson, saw a scene from the horror movie Wax, where a redneck is dumping road kills in a pile in the woods. He wanted to use that character. Shortly afterwards, Pat Reiniz (co-founder of Rednex and director of the video) saw a scene from True Detective where a serial killer is walking about in his messy home. These two influences resulted in a storyboard, which was presented to a Polish camera team, which found the location of the house.

(GF) How important do you consider social networks for the interaction between performers and fans?

(Rednex) It is somewhat important because it adds a dimension that wasn't there previously, which is the contact to people far away in territories where we never play. To receive greetings from all over the world is an awesome inspiration. That said, the best interaction will always be to meet the crowd face to face, this is without doubt the most fun way to interact and party together.

(GF) Are streaming services helping bands to reach a broader audience?

(Rednex) Streaming services and internet in general is helping any sort of spread which is good. At the same time, most giant players are strictly formatted, algorithm-based and does not allow, or even welcome, diversity and multitude. If you search for "90's music", you are likely to get the same songs every time. It does not help people to new discoveries. However, anything is better than the old pre-internet era radio monopoly, where basically one radio producer could decide an artist´s whole career. That was an unhealthy period, which has fortunately died out.

(GF) Future projects?

(Rednex) We are constantly on tour. This year we are scheduled for about 60 shows and just came back from 10 days in Japan with 7 presentations. As a result of that tour, a future project is to create a manga series out of the story from our first biography. We have an ongoing viral video contest with Manly Man, where the winner will get $1000 (manlymanvideos.com). We have yet to decide on our next single, but it is likely to be Giddy As You Are, which will be a video with only nude dancing and released in collaboration with nudist groups, so get nude and stay nude!

 


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.... we would like to inform you about The Old School Project's operation. Over time, the number of people interested in The Old School Project has steadily increased. Unlike other websites and online media, the core of The Old School Project is not the well-known journalists and radio producers, but the young people in the field of journalism who nevertheless worthy of their place. Therefore, the resources for running The Old School Project, which requires time, money and hard work, come only from its physical place, the coffeehouse.

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Written by Geisa Fernandes - Brasil / Rio de Janeiro

The repertoire of this jazz singer and awarded songwriter from Rio de Janeiro reveals influences of Brazilian popular music, the French chanson and Latin American rhythms, but most of all, Geisa Fernandes is a jazz singer. Billie Holiday aficionada (back in college folks used to call her "Lady Doc"), this PhD holder and Comics researcher was a former vocalist of several bands in São Paulo. 

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I first met Felipe Fuentes at a rehearsal for a performance at the National Museum for Visual Arts in Montevideo. Cool appeal, social awareness: the young (25), virtuoso bass/double bass “+ some other instruments” (as his social network profile advices) player and composer is one of those talents hard to tag, but easy to enjoy.

(GF) You and music: how did it start?

(FF) I could say that I had contact with music one day before I was born, when Jaime Roos, a well-known Uruguayan author visited my house. As a child, I had the habit of sitting on an armchair, next to a window facing the street and by the sound of the motors I could say the car brand. My parents have both played instruments at some point in their lives, besides being both music lovers and very curious, so I've always been in contact with many music genres. My father is a graphic designer and a photographer, so I also met many musicians through him, for he would be either photographing them or working on their album covers. But even with this favourable environment, the education system in Uruguay for music is quite disastrous, and does not have a conservatory focused on current music, which is why I have learned more in private lessons and with the experience of playing, than in any other way. That means that I had to overcome several obstacles that perhaps a good formal education would have facilitated.

 

(GF) What about your references and influences?

(FF) I have several and very varied ones. I could summarize it by saying that, like a sponge, I absorb something from everything, even things that I do not like at first. I do recognize a strong influence of Afro music in my work, not only in its Uruguayan variant, the candombe, but also as it is represented in other countries and cultures, such as in the United States, Brazil, Cuba, Morocco, Ghana, Senegal, South Africa. I also like Flamenco and the music from India, Bangladesh, Pakistan, China and Japan. Today I'm listening a lot to Flying Lotus revisiting Frank Zappa, and saxophonist Tony Malaby.

(GF) You started your career very young. Any highlights?


Since you've come so far ...

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(FF) The first time I performed live on a large stage. I was 13 years old and it was in the Sala Zitarrosa [a prestigious venue in Montevideo], as the guest of a band called Pecho e 'Fierro. I also consider a milestone my participation in the last festival hosted at the Summer Theater, an important local event.

(GF) Future projects?

(FF) Next July, I will release "Sankofa" with rapper AVR (Alvaro Silva), an album that took us 3 years to prepare. Alvaro's great-grandfather, Juan Julio Arrascaeta was actually one of the first afro poets to be published in the region. The album is a mix of candombe rhythms, hip hop drums, socially conscious lyrics and black poetry.

Written by Geisa Fernandes - Brasil / Rio de Janeiro

The repertoire of this jazz singer and awarded songwriter from Rio de Janeiro reveals influences of Brazilian popular music, the French chanson and Latin American rhythms, but most of all, Geisa Fernandes is a jazz singer. Billie Holiday aficionada (back in college folks used to call her "Lady Doc"), this PhD holder and Comics researcher was a former vocalist of several bands in São Paulo. 

Hire Geisa to review your band or your new album.

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Monday, 03 December 2018 16:31

Interview with Tiê Alves

The urban troubadour: why Tiê Alves is one of the most interesting artists of the new Brazilian popular music.

Tiê Alves updates the concept of the troubadour blending the best of the MPB (the Brazilian popular music) tradition with a urban touch, which in this case means the mega metropolis of São Paulo. The cultural melting pot of the city and its oppressive immensity are the background for inventive melodies and original lyrics performed with a blasé-yet-shy allure simply impossible to resist.

(GF) When did your contact with music start?

(TA) I began when I was a child. My mother played guitar and sang to me and my father was always very musical. At home, we heard a lot of music, mainly Brazilian music, but also The Beatles among other genres. My sister plays, as well: flute, percussion and double bass, but she works with graphic design. By the way, she developed the cover and all the artwork of my first album. I was 16 when I became interested in playing the guitar and decided to take classes. By that time, I was a huge fan of rock bands such as Nirvana and Pink Floyd. So I set up a band with my high school friends, started playing and never stopped since then. The guitar seduced me right from the start because of its versatility, but also because it is a very intimate instrument that must be kept very close to the body. It is said that the guitar “searches” for the most introspective personalities, for the shy people.

(GF) How about your musical education? Who were your mentors and influences?

(TA) I went to college and got a degree in Music at the Faculty of Arts Alcântara Machado. I also studied singing and Brazilian folk guitar, that we call “viola caipira”. I did this training as a musician, but in parallel I composed regularly. Creation has always been very important to me. Gradually, I joined other partners and developed my composition, but it all started in a very intuitive way. I was mainly influenced by Brazilian musicians, such as Caetano Veloso, Gilberto Gil and Milton Nascimento. After I have built a repertoire of original songs, in 2014 I recorded my first album: O Rio e a Lua (The River and the Moon).

(GF) And how was the production of your debut album?

(TA) It was a great learning experience. Since it was my first one, I literally learned by doing. Fortunately, I had a super talented producer named Ana Rodrigues, who understood my concept and brought a lot of information in terms of arrangements.

(GF) Any coming projects?

(TA) I'm producing my second album, “Tá Osso” (Tough Break, on a free translation) produced by guitarist Luiz Cláudio Sousa. This album has been crowdfunded and it has a strong influence of Jazz. The idea for the name came from an idiom usually used in Brazil to describe financial problems, but in the song, it describes a person who is head-over-heels.

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Since you've come so far ...

.... we would like to inform you about The Old School Project's operation. Over time, the number of people interested in The Old School Project has steadily increased. Unlike other websites and online media, the core of The Old School Project is not the well-known journalists and radio producers, but the young people in the field of journalism who nevertheless worthy of their place. Therefore, the resources for running The Old School Project, which requires time, money and hard work, come only from its physical place, the coffeehouse.

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Written by Geisa Fernandes - Brasil / Rio de Janeiro

The repertoire of this jazz singer and awarded songwriter from Rio de Janeiro reveals influences of Brazilian popular music, the French chanson and Latin American rhythms, but most of all, Geisa Fernandes is a jazz singer. Billie Holiday aficionada (back in college folks used to call her "Lady Doc"), this PhD holder and Comics researcher was a former vocalist of several bands in São Paulo. 

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Many musicians (and non musicians) had their first contact to music through a choir at school, church or community group. A choir brings back a lot of affective memories and the Brazilian group Boca Que Usa (a playful Portuguese translation of the Italian expression boca chiusa, used to describe wordless humming), from Rio de Janeiro knows just how to balance impeccable technique with a passionately executed repertoire. I talked to Amilcar de Castro, thirty years of choir experience and one of Boca Que Usa first time members, about the successful journey of the awarded group, which includes participations in festivals in Argentina, Venezuela, USA, Spain and the most recently in the city of Riga, in the Republic of Latvia.

 

(GF) What is so special about choirs?

(AC) Singing in a choir is a very rewarding experience, especially when you have the opportunity to be in a group with  a variety of repertoire that allows you to go from the erudite to the popular. It allowed me to meet several musicians from all over the world, to get in touch with diverse styles and ways of making music. When I started, I had the chance to be part of one the most influential choirs from Rio de Janeiro, Canto Em Canto, conducted by Elza Lakschevitz, a reference in Brazilian choir singing. At the same time, I started to work with Boca Que Usa. I am very proud to be part of it since its first formation, back in 1997.



(GF) How is the repertoire selected?

(AC) Boca Que Usa has a wide and diversified musical proposal. The repertoire contemplates from old to contemporary songs from many genres. We privilege tunes that are less known in Brazil   and we work under no fixed, direct regency, that is, the preparation of the songs is done collectively. Actually, collaborative work is the international current trend and it has been one of the  pillars   of our group.



(GF) The group has been active for over two decades. Any special memories?

(AC) Boca Que Usa has already won gold and silver medals representing Brazil at international festivals. Those were opportunities to show a little bit of our music to other cultures and to prove    that there is also quality choir music being done here. Another interesting moment happened during our last festival performance. We sang a tune in Latvian. The audience was very impressed!    They simply could not imagine that Brazilians would come up with a song in their language!

 


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(GF) Future plans?

(AC) Logistically and financially speaking, coordinating a trip for twenty singers is not an easy task, but the big plan of Boca Que Usa for 2019 is to take part at the ‘Garda International Choir    Festival  & Competition’, in Italy. It is a daring goal, considering that Brazil has no tradition in choir singing, what makes sponsorship or any kind of funding support extra difficult.



 


Since you've come so far ...

.... we would like to inform you about The Old School Project's operation. Over time, the number of people interested in The Old School Project has steadily increased. Unlike other websites and online media, the core of The Old School Project is not the well-known journalists and radio producers, but the young people in the field of journalism who nevertheless worthy of their place. Therefore, the resources for running The Old School Project, which requires time, money and hard work, come only from its physical place, the coffeehouse.

So to continue to provide our services to upcoming bands / artists, giving the opportunity to new journalists publish their articles, and to develop our innovative ideas, we ask you to devote a minute of your time and become a part of The Old School Project.


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Written by Geisa Fernandes - Brasil / Rio de Janeiro

The repertoire of this jazz singer and awarded songwriter from Rio de Janeiro reveals influences of Brazilian popular music, the French chanson and Latin American rhythms, but most of all, Geisa Fernandes is a jazz singer. Billie Holiday aficionada (back in college folks used to call her "Lady Doc"), this PhD holder and Comics researcher was a former vocalist of several bands in São Paulo. 

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Albert Mora was born in Cuba, in 1998. Four years later his father, a double bass player himself, introduced Albert in the world of music. His devotion to music in general and particularly to the double bass has only grown ever since, giving him the strength to overcome all sorts of political and economical problems and to carry on a career as an international musician.

(GF) Tell us about your background.

(AM) When I was thirteen, I emigrated from Cuba to Venezuela to start studying music at the José Luis Paz Conservatory, under the tutorship of my father, Luis Mora Torres who already worked as a bass teacher there. About two months later, I entered the children's orchestra of the conservatory, where I first experience being on a stage.

 

(GF) What about your influences?

(AM) My first influence came from my father and from one of my double bass teachers, Elvis Martinez. In the seven years that I have been immersed in the study of music, I have developed a great admiration for Jazz and Cuban music. They have become my favourite musical styles and I want to continue studying them. I was also influenced by musicians like: Cucho Valdez, Paquito de Rivera, Carlitos del Puerto, John Patitucci, Chick Corea and Alain Pérez.

 

(GF) You left your country very young. How was the experience of being a career in a foreign country?

(AM) Thanks to my passion to music, I have the discipline to practice daily and because of that, many doors had been opened to me. I actually became one of the most demanded bassists in my area and I had the opportunity to be part of several popular orchestras of great reputation in the country, such as: Super Combo Los Tropicales, Argenis Carruyo and his Orchestra and Orquesta Los Blancos. I am also part of several small jazz bands within the city and now I´m part of The French Alliance of Maracaibo, which gave the pleasure of working with many international artists.

 

(GF) Tell us about your current project, The Bass Project.

(AM) It is about the audio and video recording of several universal music standards interpreted by me on the double bass and electric bass. Oscar Velázquez, a good friend of mine, with whom I began to share some original ideas, helped me to create it. Since the beginning of my musical studies, I always liked the idea of ​​playing various popular melodies with the double bass, so I created a small repertoire, where I included pieces such as Lágrimas Negras and Autumn Leaves. We are now working on the audio and video recording of various tracks and our main goal with The Bass Project is to change the perspective that we have on the double bass as a solo instrument. It should also be seen as an instrument with which you can play melodies, as a violin, saxophone or a trumpet.


Since you've come so far ...

.... we would like to inform you about The Old School Project's operation. Over time, the number of people interested in The Old School Project has steadily increased. Unlike other websites and online media, the core of The Old School Project is not the well-known journalists and radio producers, but the young people in the field of journalism who nevertheless worthy of their place. Therefore, the resources for running The Old School Project, which requires time, money and hard work, come only from its physical place, the coffeehouse.

So to continue to provide our services to upcoming bands / artists, giving the opportunity to new journalists publish their articles, and to develop our innovative ideas, we ask you to devote a minute of your time and become a part of The Old School Project.


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Written by Geisa Fernandes - Brasil / Rio de Janeiro

The repertoire of this jazz singer and awarded songwriter from Rio de Janeiro reveals influences of Brazilian popular music, the French chanson and Latin American rhythms, but most of all, Geisa Fernandes is a jazz singer. Billie Holiday aficionada (back in college folks used to call her "Lady Doc"), this PhD holder and Comics researcher was a former vocalist of several bands in São Paulo. 

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I got in contact with Silvano (pianist, double bassist, guitarist and composer) the older of the Pagliuca-Mena brothers, in a forum for jazz musicians. In the middle of his moving from the shore city of Maracaibo, in Venezuela to Madrid, he found time to talk about family roots, musical identity and their music: an original blend of Venezuelan, Latin, Jazz and Classic.

 

(GF) Can you tell us about of your trajectory in music?

(SPM) Music has always been there for and with us. We come from a family of artists and intellectuals. Our mother, for instance, is a ballerina and sociologist, our father, although he did not dedicate himself to the arts, is a very creative amateur musician. That is why we had since our very early age, an inclination for the sciences and arts, particularly for music. In our family environment we were exposed to different musical genres, such as Italian popular music, flamenco - our family roots are Italian and Spanish -, traditional Venezuelan music, Latin American and Caribbean music, Jazz, European, Classic music and also Pop and Rock, among others and all those elements had a later influence in our artistic expressions. Around the age of seven, we started in musical ensembles and folkloric groups and later we took part in diverse rock bands and pop music group. Finally, we joined symphonic groups and started experimenting with Jazz.

 

(GF) When did the ensemble start?

(SPM) In 2014. The formation varied from the original duo with my brother Angelo, percussionist and composer, to up to ten musicians, depending on the event. Many other artists have called us to be their band and this feels really good. It is also nice to see both familiar and new faces in each of our presentations.

 

 


Since you've come so far ...

.... we would like to inform you about The Old School Project's operation. Over time, the number of people interested in The Old School Project has steadily increased. Unlike other websites and online media, the core of The Old School Project is not the well-known journalists and radio producers, but the young people in the field of journalism who nevertheless worthy of their place. Therefore, the resources for running The Old School Project, which requires time, money and hard work, come only from its physical place, the coffeehouse.

So to continue to provide our services to upcoming bands / artists, giving the opportunity to new journalists publish their articles, and to develop our innovative ideas, we ask you to devote a minute of your time and become a part of The Old School Project.


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(GF) How would you define your music?

(SP-M) Our music is eclectic, product of a continuous search for expression through musical art, going through different genres and musical styles. We have a very open aesthetic that fuses Jazz, Contemporary music, European academic music, Venezuelan and Latin American, flamenco and World Music, always with an original approach.

 

(GF) New projects?

(SP-M) We have finished recording our second album, short before moving to Madrid. We are very excited about it and we hope that it will be as well reviewed as the first one: "The Temple of Ideas". Our   new album,    like the previous one, was entirely produced by us, and consists of seven original songs written by me and Angelo.

We go deeper exploring our flamenco inheritance and Mediterranean sounds, among others influences. Our main project now is to establish ourselves in Madrid. Although we knew it would not be easy, it   was a step    that we felt we had to take in order to continue growing as humans and artists. We also want to assemble the ensemble again in Europe with some of our previous members. We´ll see.    

Written by Geisa Fernandes - Brasil / Rio de Janeiro

The repertoire of this jazz singer and awarded songwriter from Rio de Janeiro reveals influences of Brazilian popular music, the French chanson and Latin American rhythms, but most of all, Geisa Fernandes is a jazz singer. Billie Holiday aficionada (back in college folks used to call her "Lady Doc"), this PhD holder and Comics researcher was a former vocalist of several bands in São Paulo. 

Hire Geisa to review your band or your new album.

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Thursday, 02 May 2019 13:00

The Mutant Art Of Multi talented Tchella

From circus clown to songwriting, from São Paulo to the world: Brazilian multi artist Tchella has a lot to tell!

(GF) How was your first contact with music?

(Tchella) Probably it must have been in my mother's womb, because my father always liked music (laughs). When I was two, my parents gave me a little piano toy and I was fascinated by it. At the age of five, I got a microphone recorder and recorded thousands of songs on it. At 8, I entered the choir of the school and at 12 I started at the musical conservatory to study popular keyboard and theory. Despite to my strong connection to music, I never imagined that I would become a singer. At 12, I got in contact with performing arts and decided that I wanted to be an actress. I´ve spent my teenage years preparing myself to apply for a good performing arts school. I took circus, theatre, dance and music classes and workshops. Finally, I graduated in Performing Arts and worked professionally in the field since I was 17 years old. I have experience with theatre, street theatre, circus, cinema, advertising and music. But then, when I was 23 I started composing and I wrote many songs. That was the beginning of my career in music.

 

(GF) What are your musical references?

(Tchella) The biggest influence is Elis Regina, with her soulful and passionate interpretations. I also like Rita Lee and Maria Bethania very much and also Pitty, Tulipa Ruiz, Céu.

.

 

(GF) Working with all those forms of expression, you probably have some amazing stoires to tell. Any particular one?

(Tchella) Many ones, actually. I witnessed, for example, an audience that could not understand a word of Portuguese being moved to tears, while I sang and played the song "A Triste Partida", by Brazilian author Patativa do Assaré and I almost froze my toes once doing a tour in Portugal, in the middle of the winter, performing texts from the same author. Once I have starred in a production that won the Cannes Film Festival. I had my picture printed in international newspapers, but I only heard of the award a long time later. But one of the most memorable experiences is the presence of pianist Pepe Cisneros, who already played with Elza Soares, Caetano, Fabiana Cozza, Toninho Horta recording a track in my first album: Transmutante.

 

(GF) Any new projects?

(Tchella) The Transmutante Tour begins in May 2019. It will start in Rio de Janeiro, with a presentation at Audio Rebel on the 19th. On the 28th I'm in São Paulo at Centro Cultural São Paulo. This year, I will also visit Brasília, Curitiba and Belo Horizonte. In the second half of the year, I will release the music video Supernatural, a super production with a super team and a Tchella totally transmuted on stage. And new singles are also planned to be released in music platforms by the end of the year.

 

Written by Geisa Fernandes - Brasil / Rio de Janeiro

The repertoire of this jazz singer and awarded songwriter from Rio de Janeiro reveals influences of Brazilian popular music, the French chanson and Latin American rhythms, but most of all, Geisa Fernandes is a jazz singer. Billie Holiday aficionada (back in college folks used to call her "Lady Doc"), this PhD holder and Comics researcher was a former vocalist of several bands in São Paulo. 

Hire Geisa to review your band or your new album.

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I met Uiara Leigo at a conference for indie musicians in São Paulo. We exchanged CDs and she explained me in her deep, calm voice that she had worked for a long time as a nurse. Later, while listening to her album, it all made sense: Uiara takes care of people and their needs. Traditional African rhythms are the starting point for a musical journey filled with lyrics about racism, homo and transphobia among other delicate subjects, without sounding preachy. Beautifully human, with a scent of magic.

(GF) Can you tell us about your first contact with music?

I guess it all started in my mother´s womb, when I first listened to the sounds of the percussion. My father used to play during religions ceremonies held by my grandmother. She was what we call “mãe de santo” [a priest woman in African religions] and my father, an amateur musician and composer, was my first contact to music. I guess my heartbeat was defined by that drums. I always wanted to be a singer and my great influences were The Beatles, U2, Brazilian rockers such as Renato Russo, Cazuza and Cássia Eller and the MPB (Brazilian popular m usic) tradition: Caetano Veloso and Maria Bethânia. As a child, I took part in a religious choir and when I was 13, I learned to play the guitar with my brother, a musical therapist and teacher, but apart from that, I never had any musical training. Instead, I went to the Nursing College in Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais (I am originally from a small town in Rio de Janeiro called Macaé).

(GF) And when was your “come back” to the music?

Only after graduation. By then, I´ve decided to make my dream come true. I began singing in bars. I was also part of a rock band, but in 2010 I decided to launch my solo career with an album called “Pedra Bruta” (“Rough Stone”). Six years later, I released “Meu Canto é Segredo” (“My Song is Secret”).

(GF) How would you define your music?

I propose a universe of creation with no rules or labels. This concept guided my last project, giving me the freedom to mix the influences of important Brazilian movements, such as Tropicalism, with my childhood references, the sounds of the candomblé drums. Together with my musical producer Hérmanes Abreu, we created a very special sound for the project, reaffirming our African-Brazilian musical heritage. The promotional single “Basta” (“Enough”) is a call for reflection upon all sorts of intolerance.


Since you've come so far ...

.... we would like to inform you about The Old School Project's operation. Over time, the number of people interested in The Old School Project has steadily increased. Unlike other websites and online media, the core of The Old School Project is not the well-known journalists and radio producers, but the young people in the field of journalism who nevertheless worthy of their place. Therefore, the resources for running The Old School Project, which requires time, money and hard work, come only from its physical place, the coffeehouse.

So to continue to provide our services to upcoming bands / artists, giving the opportunity to new journalists publish their articles, and to develop our innovative ideas, we ask you to devote a minute of your time and become a part of The Old School Project.


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(GF) What´s next?

I am recording a new project called “Somos feitos do agora” ("We're made of now"). It is inspired by reflections on time and happiness, conflicts, hope, solitude and love. I wrote all five tracks and the arrangements bring a mix of Rock´n´Roll, Blues and Progressive. I stick with the primordial characteristic in my career: the freedom of creation!

Written by Geisa Fernandes - Brasil / Rio de Janeiro

The repertoire of this jazz singer and awarded songwriter from Rio de Janeiro reveals influences of Brazilian popular music, the French chanson and Latin American rhythms, but most of all, Geisa Fernandes is a jazz singer. Billie Holiday aficionada (back in college folks used to call her "Lady Doc"), this PhD holder and Comics researcher was a former vocalist of several bands in São Paulo. 

Hire Geisa to review your band or your new album.

For more info feel free to Contact Us

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Published in South America Section
Saturday, 26 May 2018 00:00

The portrait of Santiago Tavella

 

A portrait of the artist as a mature man: why you should find out more about Santiago Tavella right now!

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The year is 2012 and I am about to leave the City Hall after an amazing performance of Uruguayan rock band El Cuarteto de Nos. I had never heard of them before and but the amazing songs, full of complicate games of words and cultural references got me hooked instantly. Back home, I looked for every piece of information I could find about the band and the name of Santiago Tavella popped up, not only as one of the band leaders (together with Roberto Musso), but also as the songwriter of many of the groups compositions. On the following evening, I went to see them again and introduced myself to Tavella. That´s how we started a conversation that goes on since then. I asked Santiago to talk about his project "Otro Tavella" ("Another Tavella), which presents a mature, yet refreshed artist, the singularities of it, compared to his work in the Grammy awarded band Cuarteto de Nos and the importance of literature to his music. Ladies and gents, Santiago Tavella:

(GF) Otro Tavella is your first solo project. When did it start?

(ST) Otro Tavella was always present in my mind, as a concept. 1984 I played a solo recital for the first time. There was another attempt at the end of the 90s, another one in 2009 (this time I experimented a lot with electronic sounds) and basically from 2012 it has its currently format, with much emphasis on natural sounds and no overproduction. In that sense, it is totally different from the kind of sound and the production I experience with the Cuarteto. My son, Martín Tavella (bass), was the first recruited, followed by Ignacio Lanzani on guitars and Sebastián Macció on the drums. The female choir of Josefina Trías and Analía Ruiz came as a recommendation of Nelly Pacheco, my singing teacher. The VJ Virginia Arigón is responsible for linking the music to the wonderful world of visual arts.


Since you've come so far ...

.... we would like to inform you about The Old School Project's operation. Over time, the number of people interested in The Old School Project has steadily increased. Unlike other websites and online media, the core of The Old School Project is not the well-known journalists and radio producers, but the young people in the field of journalism who nevertheless worthy of their place. Therefore, the resources for running The Old School Project, which requires time, money and hard work, come only from its physical place, the coffeehouse.

So to continue to provide our services to upcoming bands / artists, giving the opportunity to new journalists publish their articles, and to develop our innovative ideas, we ask you to devote a minute of your time and become a part of The Old School Project.


You want to go bigger? Enter your own contribution amount.


 

(GF) Does Otro Tavella represents a disruption or a development?

I Would say that it is a mutation of my artistic personality. Literature is an important component of this project. We propose an exercise of reading between lines. The audience is invited be part of the interpretation of what we do, something that may not be very "marketable", but that is obviously lacking in the bulk of contemporary musical and artistic production. Music and lyrics are equally important to this project. They complement and relate to each other. Therefore, although Otro Tavella could be labeled as Rock/Pop, there is an important amount of stylistic elements in this project that goes beyond those genres. I guess there is some maturity involved too, but not in the sense of becoming "politically correct" or "conservative" and it has certainly nothing to do with becoming a silly old man, which is pretty much the idea of maturity nowadays.

Published in South America Section
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