Displaying items by tag: Geisa Fernandes

Entropia (Entropy) is the measure of disorder of a system, but the third album of Brazilian singer/songwriter and guitar player Edu Aguiar is far from chaos. The “late musician” (as he calls himself) from Rio de Janeiro presents a real tribute to the best of Brazilian popular music (MPB) tradition: elegant melodies, inspired lyrics and that irresistible bossa- nova-jazz touch. Enjoy!

(GF) When did your relationship with music start?

(EA) My parents were lovers and listened to all kinds of music. As a teenager I already wanted to work with music, but ironically I only had the courage to make my debut after my forties. I was very discouraged by my father, who used to say that an artist in Brazil was doomed to starve. Despite of that, during high school I started composing alone or together with a friend. I recorded the melodies of my songs on cassette tapes and kept them. All my albums have some material from those tapes and I still have a lot of unreleased recordings that I plan to use in future projects.

(GF) What are your musical references?

(EA) Peter Gabriel, Beatles, Stones, Led Zeppelin, REM and Pearl Jam come right in mind. Big Brazilian icons, such as Joao Gilberto, Nara, Tom and Vinicius, and Paulinho da Viola, Edu Lobo, Chico, Caetano, Gil, Milton. And also recent names in music, such as Livia Nestrovski, among many others.

(GF) Tell us a little about the history of the production of the new CD, "Entropia" (Entropy)?

(EA) After my previous album, "Dias de Blumer", I already had the new project in mind, and decided that it would be all as acoustic as possible, preferably with strings, voice and percussion. With this concept in mind, I invited my friend Mingo Araújo, a renowned percussionist; because I knew that the work I wanted would only be possible with his rhythmic texture. He was also the one responsible for bringing Camila Matoso to our team, an interpreter with the kind of voice, attitude and personality required to perform for the first time a song that had never been heard by anyone before. She sings 12 out of the 14 songs on the album. And there is also an instrumental tune and a song performed by guest singer Zélia Duncan. Geraldo Azevedo, Fred Martins and Eugenio Dale are also on the vocals. My first minimalist concept was replaced by a more organic aesthetic, but I think we quite kept the original spirit of the project.

(GF) Future Projects?

(EA) I have two new projects, one already in progress, similar to "Entropia", with some new partners. The other one is still a draft: an album with songs sang in Spanish, co-authored with several South American artists. I hope to release it in 2021 and I might even spend some time abroad to make this project happen. Let's see what comes. Independent production is always a little box full of surprises.

Written by Geisa Fernandes - Brasil / Rio de Janeiro

The repertoire of this jazz singer and awarded songwriter from Rio de Janeiro reveals influences of Brazilian popular music, the French chanson and Latin American rhythms, but most of all, Geisa Fernandes is a jazz singer. Billie Holiday aficionada (back in college folks used to call her "Lady Doc"), this PhD holder and Comics researcher was a former vocalist of several bands in São Paulo. 

Hire Geisa to review your band or your new album.

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Published in South America Section

 

I met Venezuelan trombonist Gregory Boza while hiring musicians for my first gig in Lima, Peru. His contact was given to me by a common friend, also leaving abroad and I couldn´t help thinking how the ups and downs of his native country in recent years impacted the trajectory of many musicians, who are now starting over in different music scenarios. Boza told me his first days in Peru were very hard and that we had to take many under-qualified jobs before being able to get a place as a musician and that competition was very hard. How did he deal with it? With a little help from the Buddhist wisdom. Familiar with the faith for a long time already, since 2018 Boza became a regular practitioner of meditation. According to him, “it helps to focus on the really important things”.

 

(GF) When did you start learning music?

(GB) My contact with music was at the age of 14. In 2008, I started in the National Orchestral System of Youth and Children's Choirs, in Trujillo. Six months later, I moved to Maracaibo and there I went to the Jose Luis Paz Music Conservatory. A year later I entered the Zuliana Youth Rafael Urdaneta Symphony (OSJZRU)), which belonged to the system of orchestras. 2011 the Maracaibo Big Band was created and they invited me to be part of a big band with Andrés Briceño, who regularly offered workshops for drummers in Maracaibo. Roberto Paredes decided to carry on with the big band project and I played with them up to the end of 2017.

 

(GF) And how about your musical references?

(GB) My musical references change according to the challenges that music presents to me, but during my formation years I listened to music from all genres: Mahler, Tchaikovsky, Brahms, pieces for trombone and also a lot of Jazz, Michel Camilo, Pat Metheny, J.J. Johnson among others.

 

(GF) Special highlights?

(GB) 2011 I travelled to Italy to the Bergamo Cultural Festival with the OSJZRU. I had the opportunity to work with great singers, such as Rafael el Brito Chicken, Ilan Chester, among others. Playing symphonic repertoire, I travelled to Caracas and played at the Latin American Trombone Academy, led by Maestro Miguel Sanchez. I travelled many times to Caracas in order to have classes with renowned teachers such as Norman Bolter, Angel Subero and Giovanny Scarpetta. 2012 I decided to move to Caracas and become a regular student at the academy. I had bass trombone classes with Franklin Moreno. I lived there up to the end of 2013.

 

(GF) How about your future projects?

(GB) I am actually starting in a new band. Last June I was invited to become a member of Los Barraza, a well-known Peruvian orchestra. They have a very busy agenda with presentations in different parts of the country and I am very excited about it.


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Written by Geisa Fernandes - Brasil / Rio de Janeiro

The repertoire of this jazz singer and awarded songwriter from Rio de Janeiro reveals influences of Brazilian popular music, the French chanson and Latin American rhythms, but most of all, Geisa Fernandes is a jazz singer. Billie Holiday aficionada (back in college folks used to call her "Lady Doc"), this PhD holder and Comics researcher was a former vocalist of several bands in São Paulo. 

Hire Geisa to review your band or your new album.

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Published in South America Section

 

(GF) How is your songwriting process?

(Rednex) It has been the same as from two decades ago. It starts with an upbeat hookline sung by a toothless 85 year old man who is about to die, followed by a crazy violin with so many notes it has to be recorded at half speed. Last, and very least, we let the woman sing.

(GF) Acid humor has always been a component of Rednex and Manly Man is no exception. How was the video production?

(Rednex) Thanks for the phrase "acid humor" :) love it! The main songwriter of the track, Janne Eriksson, saw a scene from the horror movie Wax, where a redneck is dumping road kills in a pile in the woods. He wanted to use that character. Shortly afterwards, Pat Reiniz (co-founder of Rednex and director of the video) saw a scene from True Detective where a serial killer is walking about in his messy home. These two influences resulted in a storyboard, which was presented to a Polish camera team, which found the location of the house.

(GF) How important do you consider social networks for the interaction between performers and fans?

(Rednex) It is somewhat important because it adds a dimension that wasn't there previously, which is the contact to people far away in territories where we never play. To receive greetings from all over the world is an awesome inspiration. That said, the best interaction will always be to meet the crowd face to face, this is without doubt the most fun way to interact and party together.

(GF) Are streaming services helping bands to reach a broader audience?

(Rednex) Streaming services and internet in general is helping any sort of spread which is good. At the same time, most giant players are strictly formatted, algorithm-based and does not allow, or even welcome, diversity and multitude. If you search for "90's music", you are likely to get the same songs every time. It does not help people to new discoveries. However, anything is better than the old pre-internet era radio monopoly, where basically one radio producer could decide an artist´s whole career. That was an unhealthy period, which has fortunately died out.

(GF) Future projects?

(Rednex) We are constantly on tour. This year we are scheduled for about 60 shows and just came back from 10 days in Japan with 7 presentations. As a result of that tour, a future project is to create a manga series out of the story from our first biography. We have an ongoing viral video contest with Manly Man, where the winner will get $1000 (manlymanvideos.com). We have yet to decide on our next single, but it is likely to be Giddy As You Are, which will be a video with only nude dancing and released in collaboration with nudist groups, so get nude and stay nude!

 


Since you've come so far ...

.... we would like to inform you about The Old School Project's operation. Over time, the number of people interested in The Old School Project has steadily increased. Unlike other websites and online media, the core of The Old School Project is not the well-known journalists and radio producers, but the young people in the field of journalism who nevertheless worthy of their place. Therefore, the resources for running The Old School Project, which requires time, money and hard work, come only from its physical place, the coffeehouse.

So to continue to provide our services to upcoming bands / artists, giving the opportunity to new journalists publish their articles, and to develop our innovative ideas, we ask you to devote a minute of your time and become a part of The Old School Project.


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Written by Geisa Fernandes - Brasil / Rio de Janeiro

The repertoire of this jazz singer and awarded songwriter from Rio de Janeiro reveals influences of Brazilian popular music, the French chanson and Latin American rhythms, but most of all, Geisa Fernandes is a jazz singer. Billie Holiday aficionada (back in college folks used to call her "Lady Doc"), this PhD holder and Comics researcher was a former vocalist of several bands in São Paulo. 

Hire Geisa to review your band or your new album.

For more info feel free to Contact Us

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Vinicius Oliveira is only 30, but he´s definitely got an old soul. No wonder this autodidact musician/singer/songwriter felt just at home at the Trio de Couro e Cordas, revisiting traditional Brazilian samba and making it sound brand new.

(GF) How was your first contact music?

(VO) Since my childhood I listened to my mother´s the old records, but I became very interested in it when I was 15 and I got my first instrument as a birthday present: a ukulele. From this day on, I´ve been intensively researched the history of Brazilian music, focusing on samba and Candeia, one of the icons of the genre, was the subject of my undergraduate thesis in History.

(GF) What are your references?

(VO) I´ve been influenced by various genres and I love samba and jazz. Tom Jobim, Johnny Alf, Paulinho da Viola, Joao Nogueira, Joao Donato, Gilberto Gil, Djavan, Custódio Mesquita, Nelson Cavaquinho, Dorival Caymmi, Radamés Gnattalli, Gershwin and Cole Porter are among my many references. As an interpreter, I try to leave a personal signature, focusing on rhythmic division and cool, organic singing, without excesses.

(GF) Tell us about the Trio de Couro e Cordas:

(VO) The group was created in 2011 by percussionist Rodolpho Dutra, who wanted to put up a samba repertoire for a trio. One year later I was invited to join its second line-up and became responsible for selecting the songs. The idea was to reach out for   the audience, avoiding the most frequently repeated tunes, but rather through a more daring repertoire. Our first prize came in 2013, when we won the Soulvision Festival in São Paulo with one of my songs. In the same year we were selected to take part   in   the project “Samba rundt bordet" (Samba around the table) in Norway, where we presented a little bit of Brazilian music to children and teenagers. This project was a milestone for the Trio. It brought us not only a lot of experience, but also showed us   how far the love for music could take us. Learning how to perform in a musical play was very challenging and we had to sing some songs in Norwegian too, but it all went very well. The show was such a success that, although only two tours had been   initially planned, we made four tours between 2013 and 2015. Bruno Campos has been the guitarist since 2014. He is also co-responsible for the arrangements.

 

(GF) Future projects?

(VO) The Trio is currently performing a tribute to the great poet Vinicius de Moraes and I am working on my first solo album. It is influenced by samba-jazz and bossa nova, but most of all, it reflects my idea of Brazil. I wrote all the songs and amazing musicians, such as Roberto Menescal, Arthur Maia, Humberto Araújo and Kiko Continentino are taking part in it. The release is planned for the first half of 2020.

Written by Geisa Fernandes - Brasil / Rio de Janeiro

The repertoire of this jazz singer and awarded songwriter from Rio de Janeiro reveals influences of Brazilian popular music, the French chanson and Latin American rhythms, but most of all, Geisa Fernandes is a jazz singer. Billie Holiday aficionada (back in college folks used to call her "Lady Doc"), this PhD holder and Comics researcher was a former vocalist of several bands in São Paulo. 

Hire Geisa to review your band or your new album.

For more info feel free to Contact Us

Geisa Has Already Published...

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I first met Felipe Fuentes at a rehearsal for a performance at the National Museum for Visual Arts in Montevideo. Cool appeal, social awareness: the young (25), virtuoso bass/double bass “+ some other instruments” (as his social network profile advices) player and composer is one of those talents hard to tag, but easy to enjoy.

(GF) You and music: how did it start?

(FF) I could say that I had contact with music one day before I was born, when Jaime Roos, a well-known Uruguayan author visited my house. As a child, I had the habit of sitting on an armchair, next to a window facing the street and by the sound of the motors I could say the car brand. My parents have both played instruments at some point in their lives, besides being both music lovers and very curious, so I've always been in contact with many music genres. My father is a graphic designer and a photographer, so I also met many musicians through him, for he would be either photographing them or working on their album covers. But even with this favourable environment, the education system in Uruguay for music is quite disastrous, and does not have a conservatory focused on current music, which is why I have learned more in private lessons and with the experience of playing, than in any other way. That means that I had to overcome several obstacles that perhaps a good formal education would have facilitated.

 

(GF) What about your references and influences?

(FF) I have several and very varied ones. I could summarize it by saying that, like a sponge, I absorb something from everything, even things that I do not like at first. I do recognize a strong influence of Afro music in my work, not only in its Uruguayan variant, the candombe, but also as it is represented in other countries and cultures, such as in the United States, Brazil, Cuba, Morocco, Ghana, Senegal, South Africa. I also like Flamenco and the music from India, Bangladesh, Pakistan, China and Japan. Today I'm listening a lot to Flying Lotus revisiting Frank Zappa, and saxophonist Tony Malaby.

(GF) You started your career very young. Any highlights?


Since you've come so far ...

.... we would like to inform you about The Old School Project's operation. Over time, the number of people interested in The Old School Project has steadily increased. Unlike other websites and online media, the core of The Old School Project is not the well-known journalists and radio producers, but the young people in the field of journalism who nevertheless worthy of their place. Therefore, the resources for running The Old School Project, which requires time, money and hard work, come only from its physical place, the coffeehouse.

So to continue to provide our services to upcoming bands / artists, giving the opportunity to new journalists publish their articles, and to develop our innovative ideas, we ask you to devote a minute of your time and become a part of The Old School Project.


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(FF) The first time I performed live on a large stage. I was 13 years old and it was in the Sala Zitarrosa [a prestigious venue in Montevideo], as the guest of a band called Pecho e 'Fierro. I also consider a milestone my participation in the last festival hosted at the Summer Theater, an important local event.

(GF) Future projects?

(FF) Next July, I will release "Sankofa" with rapper AVR (Alvaro Silva), an album that took us 3 years to prepare. Alvaro's great-grandfather, Juan Julio Arrascaeta was actually one of the first afro poets to be published in the region. The album is a mix of candombe rhythms, hip hop drums, socially conscious lyrics and black poetry.

Written by Geisa Fernandes - Brasil / Rio de Janeiro

The repertoire of this jazz singer and awarded songwriter from Rio de Janeiro reveals influences of Brazilian popular music, the French chanson and Latin American rhythms, but most of all, Geisa Fernandes is a jazz singer. Billie Holiday aficionada (back in college folks used to call her "Lady Doc"), this PhD holder and Comics researcher was a former vocalist of several bands in São Paulo. 

Hire Geisa to review your band or your new album.

For more info feel free to Contact Us

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Monday, 03 December 2018 16:31

Interview with Tiê Alves

The urban troubadour: why Tiê Alves is one of the most interesting artists of the new Brazilian popular music.

Tiê Alves updates the concept of the troubadour blending the best of the MPB (the Brazilian popular music) tradition with a urban touch, which in this case means the mega metropolis of São Paulo. The cultural melting pot of the city and its oppressive immensity are the background for inventive melodies and original lyrics performed with a blasé-yet-shy allure simply impossible to resist.

(GF) When did your contact with music start?

(TA) I began when I was a child. My mother played guitar and sang to me and my father was always very musical. At home, we heard a lot of music, mainly Brazilian music, but also The Beatles among other genres. My sister plays, as well: flute, percussion and double bass, but she works with graphic design. By the way, she developed the cover and all the artwork of my first album. I was 16 when I became interested in playing the guitar and decided to take classes. By that time, I was a huge fan of rock bands such as Nirvana and Pink Floyd. So I set up a band with my high school friends, started playing and never stopped since then. The guitar seduced me right from the start because of its versatility, but also because it is a very intimate instrument that must be kept very close to the body. It is said that the guitar “searches” for the most introspective personalities, for the shy people.

(GF) How about your musical education? Who were your mentors and influences?

(TA) I went to college and got a degree in Music at the Faculty of Arts Alcântara Machado. I also studied singing and Brazilian folk guitar, that we call “viola caipira”. I did this training as a musician, but in parallel I composed regularly. Creation has always been very important to me. Gradually, I joined other partners and developed my composition, but it all started in a very intuitive way. I was mainly influenced by Brazilian musicians, such as Caetano Veloso, Gilberto Gil and Milton Nascimento. After I have built a repertoire of original songs, in 2014 I recorded my first album: O Rio e a Lua (The River and the Moon).

(GF) And how was the production of your debut album?

(TA) It was a great learning experience. Since it was my first one, I literally learned by doing. Fortunately, I had a super talented producer named Ana Rodrigues, who understood my concept and brought a lot of information in terms of arrangements.

(GF) Any coming projects?

(TA) I'm producing my second album, “Tá Osso” (Tough Break, on a free translation) produced by guitarist Luiz Cláudio Sousa. This album has been crowdfunded and it has a strong influence of Jazz. The idea for the name came from an idiom usually used in Brazil to describe financial problems, but in the song, it describes a person who is head-over-heels.

Follow Tiê Alves on Social Media

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Since you've come so far ...

.... we would like to inform you about The Old School Project's operation. Over time, the number of people interested in The Old School Project has steadily increased. Unlike other websites and online media, the core of The Old School Project is not the well-known journalists and radio producers, but the young people in the field of journalism who nevertheless worthy of their place. Therefore, the resources for running The Old School Project, which requires time, money and hard work, come only from its physical place, the coffeehouse.

So to continue to provide our services to upcoming bands / artists, giving the opportunity to new journalists publish their articles, and to develop our innovative ideas, we ask you to devote a minute of your time and become a part of The Old School Project.


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Written by Geisa Fernandes - Brasil / Rio de Janeiro

The repertoire of this jazz singer and awarded songwriter from Rio de Janeiro reveals influences of Brazilian popular music, the French chanson and Latin American rhythms, but most of all, Geisa Fernandes is a jazz singer. Billie Holiday aficionada (back in college folks used to call her "Lady Doc"), this PhD holder and Comics researcher was a former vocalist of several bands in São Paulo. 

Hire Geisa to review your band or your new album.

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Wednesday, 02 October 2019 18:01

A Brazilian That Looks To The World: Everton Firmeza

(GF) How did your relationship with music start?

(EF) Since an early age, I´ve listened and enjoyed music. My father, an amateur musician himself, played tambourine and always had a lot of fun. I associate music with joy and positive vibes this day. At 13 I started to learn guitar and electric bass. I decided to pursue my career as a musician, when I was around 15. I even started a technical degree, but soon realized that was not what I wanted for me.

(GF) What are your main musical references?

(EF) I simply have to mention firstly the Brazilian music. Its tradition is so rich and strong that provides me a lot of material to deal with, so I am constantly researching on current and old composers and performers. I admire Hermeto Pascoal, Hamilton de Hollanda, Yamandú Costa, Tom Jobim, Pipoquinha, among many others. I was also got in touch with jazz and experimental music during my studies. In the jazz field, I admire the Bill Evans's Trio and the brilliant double bass player Scott LaFaro and John Coltrane's Quartet. In experimental music, I like Webern and Steve Reich very much. Frank Zappa is also a great reference!

 

(GF) What is it like working with a Brazilian tradition genre, such as Choro, in Europe?

(EF) I think it's really cool to be able to work with Choro and Brazilian Music here. I live since 2015 in Brussels, a very interesting, multicultural city. Here I was able to meet many musicians, also Brazilians, who are very interested and talented, and who play Brazilian music very well. People here are also very interested in our music and in our culture in general and so I could build an engaged fan base. Learning French and Dutch help me a lot, too.

 

(GF) Tell us about your latest album, ‘Burocrático’ (Bureaucratic)

(EF) Burocrático is the third album of the Everton Firmeza Trio. I started it in 2014, when I was still living in Belo Horizonte, because I wanted to have a project of mine, in which I would take the lead and make all the important decisions. Usually as a bass player I work on other musicians' projects, and I'm always subject to their decisions. I then invited Fred Selva, vibraphonist, and Felipe Bastos, drummer and percussionist, to record the album ‘Firmeza!’ and promote it in some gigs in the city. Later, when I came to Brussels in 2015, I invited Italian pianist Piergiorgio Pirro and drummer Josaphat Hounnou from Benin, a West African country that has many cultural similarities with Brazil to continue the project. Piergiorgio studied classical music, jazz and experimental music, while Josaphat thoroughly studied Benin and African rhythms, but also jazz and pop music. Since then we have done several presentations and recorded two albums: Younger ‘Brother’ (2018) and ‘Burocrático’ (2019), which has been recorded in a single day.

Written by Geisa Fernandes - Brasil / Rio de Janeiro

The repertoire of this jazz singer and awarded songwriter from Rio de Janeiro reveals influences of Brazilian popular music, the French chanson and Latin American rhythms, but most of all, Geisa Fernandes is a jazz singer. Billie Holiday aficionada (back in college folks used to call her "Lady Doc"), this PhD holder and Comics researcher was a former vocalist of several bands in São Paulo. 

Hire Geisa to review your band or your new album.

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Many musicians (and non musicians) had their first contact to music through a choir at school, church or community group. A choir brings back a lot of affective memories and the Brazilian group Boca Que Usa (a playful Portuguese translation of the Italian expression boca chiusa, used to describe wordless humming), from Rio de Janeiro knows just how to balance impeccable technique with a passionately executed repertoire. I talked to Amilcar de Castro, thirty years of choir experience and one of Boca Que Usa first time members, about the successful journey of the awarded group, which includes participations in festivals in Argentina, Venezuela, USA, Spain and the most recently in the city of Riga, in the Republic of Latvia.

 

(GF) What is so special about choirs?

(AC) Singing in a choir is a very rewarding experience, especially when you have the opportunity to be in a group with  a variety of repertoire that allows you to go from the erudite to the popular. It allowed me to meet several musicians from all over the world, to get in touch with diverse styles and ways of making music. When I started, I had the chance to be part of one the most influential choirs from Rio de Janeiro, Canto Em Canto, conducted by Elza Lakschevitz, a reference in Brazilian choir singing. At the same time, I started to work with Boca Que Usa. I am very proud to be part of it since its first formation, back in 1997.



(GF) How is the repertoire selected?

(AC) Boca Que Usa has a wide and diversified musical proposal. The repertoire contemplates from old to contemporary songs from many genres. We privilege tunes that are less known in Brazil   and we work under no fixed, direct regency, that is, the preparation of the songs is done collectively. Actually, collaborative work is the international current trend and it has been one of the  pillars   of our group.



(GF) The group has been active for over two decades. Any special memories?

(AC) Boca Que Usa has already won gold and silver medals representing Brazil at international festivals. Those were opportunities to show a little bit of our music to other cultures and to prove    that there is also quality choir music being done here. Another interesting moment happened during our last festival performance. We sang a tune in Latvian. The audience was very impressed!    They simply could not imagine that Brazilians would come up with a song in their language!

 


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(GF) Future plans?

(AC) Logistically and financially speaking, coordinating a trip for twenty singers is not an easy task, but the big plan of Boca Que Usa for 2019 is to take part at the ‘Garda International Choir    Festival  & Competition’, in Italy. It is a daring goal, considering that Brazil has no tradition in choir singing, what makes sponsorship or any kind of funding support extra difficult.



 


Since you've come so far ...

.... we would like to inform you about The Old School Project's operation. Over time, the number of people interested in The Old School Project has steadily increased. Unlike other websites and online media, the core of The Old School Project is not the well-known journalists and radio producers, but the young people in the field of journalism who nevertheless worthy of their place. Therefore, the resources for running The Old School Project, which requires time, money and hard work, come only from its physical place, the coffeehouse.

So to continue to provide our services to upcoming bands / artists, giving the opportunity to new journalists publish their articles, and to develop our innovative ideas, we ask you to devote a minute of your time and become a part of The Old School Project.


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Written by Geisa Fernandes - Brasil / Rio de Janeiro

The repertoire of this jazz singer and awarded songwriter from Rio de Janeiro reveals influences of Brazilian popular music, the French chanson and Latin American rhythms, but most of all, Geisa Fernandes is a jazz singer. Billie Holiday aficionada (back in college folks used to call her "Lady Doc"), this PhD holder and Comics researcher was a former vocalist of several bands in São Paulo. 

Hire Geisa to review your band or your new album.

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Albert Mora was born in Cuba, in 1998. Four years later his father, a double bass player himself, introduced Albert in the world of music. His devotion to music in general and particularly to the double bass has only grown ever since, giving him the strength to overcome all sorts of political and economical problems and to carry on a career as an international musician.

(GF) Tell us about your background.

(AM) When I was thirteen, I emigrated from Cuba to Venezuela to start studying music at the José Luis Paz Conservatory, under the tutorship of my father, Luis Mora Torres who already worked as a bass teacher there. About two months later, I entered the children's orchestra of the conservatory, where I first experience being on a stage.

 

(GF) What about your influences?

(AM) My first influence came from my father and from one of my double bass teachers, Elvis Martinez. In the seven years that I have been immersed in the study of music, I have developed a great admiration for Jazz and Cuban music. They have become my favourite musical styles and I want to continue studying them. I was also influenced by musicians like: Cucho Valdez, Paquito de Rivera, Carlitos del Puerto, John Patitucci, Chick Corea and Alain Pérez.

 

(GF) You left your country very young. How was the experience of being a career in a foreign country?

(AM) Thanks to my passion to music, I have the discipline to practice daily and because of that, many doors had been opened to me. I actually became one of the most demanded bassists in my area and I had the opportunity to be part of several popular orchestras of great reputation in the country, such as: Super Combo Los Tropicales, Argenis Carruyo and his Orchestra and Orquesta Los Blancos. I am also part of several small jazz bands within the city and now I´m part of The French Alliance of Maracaibo, which gave the pleasure of working with many international artists.

 

(GF) Tell us about your current project, The Bass Project.

(AM) It is about the audio and video recording of several universal music standards interpreted by me on the double bass and electric bass. Oscar Velázquez, a good friend of mine, with whom I began to share some original ideas, helped me to create it. Since the beginning of my musical studies, I always liked the idea of ​​playing various popular melodies with the double bass, so I created a small repertoire, where I included pieces such as Lágrimas Negras and Autumn Leaves. We are now working on the audio and video recording of various tracks and our main goal with The Bass Project is to change the perspective that we have on the double bass as a solo instrument. It should also be seen as an instrument with which you can play melodies, as a violin, saxophone or a trumpet.


Since you've come so far ...

.... we would like to inform you about The Old School Project's operation. Over time, the number of people interested in The Old School Project has steadily increased. Unlike other websites and online media, the core of The Old School Project is not the well-known journalists and radio producers, but the young people in the field of journalism who nevertheless worthy of their place. Therefore, the resources for running The Old School Project, which requires time, money and hard work, come only from its physical place, the coffeehouse.

So to continue to provide our services to upcoming bands / artists, giving the opportunity to new journalists publish their articles, and to develop our innovative ideas, we ask you to devote a minute of your time and become a part of The Old School Project.


You want to go bigger? Enter your own contribution amount.


 

Written by Geisa Fernandes - Brasil / Rio de Janeiro

The repertoire of this jazz singer and awarded songwriter from Rio de Janeiro reveals influences of Brazilian popular music, the French chanson and Latin American rhythms, but most of all, Geisa Fernandes is a jazz singer. Billie Holiday aficionada (back in college folks used to call her "Lady Doc"), this PhD holder and Comics researcher was a former vocalist of several bands in São Paulo. 

Hire Geisa to review your band or your new album.

For more info feel free to Contact Us

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I got in contact with Silvano (pianist, double bassist, guitarist and composer) the older of the Pagliuca-Mena brothers, in a forum for jazz musicians. In the middle of his moving from the shore city of Maracaibo, in Venezuela to Madrid, he found time to talk about family roots, musical identity and their music: an original blend of Venezuelan, Latin, Jazz and Classic.

 

(GF) Can you tell us about of your trajectory in music?

(SPM) Music has always been there for and with us. We come from a family of artists and intellectuals. Our mother, for instance, is a ballerina and sociologist, our father, although he did not dedicate himself to the arts, is a very creative amateur musician. That is why we had since our very early age, an inclination for the sciences and arts, particularly for music. In our family environment we were exposed to different musical genres, such as Italian popular music, flamenco - our family roots are Italian and Spanish -, traditional Venezuelan music, Latin American and Caribbean music, Jazz, European, Classic music and also Pop and Rock, among others and all those elements had a later influence in our artistic expressions. Around the age of seven, we started in musical ensembles and folkloric groups and later we took part in diverse rock bands and pop music group. Finally, we joined symphonic groups and started experimenting with Jazz.

 

(GF) When did the ensemble start?

(SPM) In 2014. The formation varied from the original duo with my brother Angelo, percussionist and composer, to up to ten musicians, depending on the event. Many other artists have called us to be their band and this feels really good. It is also nice to see both familiar and new faces in each of our presentations.

 

 


Since you've come so far ...

.... we would like to inform you about The Old School Project's operation. Over time, the number of people interested in The Old School Project has steadily increased. Unlike other websites and online media, the core of The Old School Project is not the well-known journalists and radio producers, but the young people in the field of journalism who nevertheless worthy of their place. Therefore, the resources for running The Old School Project, which requires time, money and hard work, come only from its physical place, the coffeehouse.

So to continue to provide our services to upcoming bands / artists, giving the opportunity to new journalists publish their articles, and to develop our innovative ideas, we ask you to devote a minute of your time and become a part of The Old School Project.


You want to go bigger? Enter your own contribution amount.


 

 

(GF) How would you define your music?

(SP-M) Our music is eclectic, product of a continuous search for expression through musical art, going through different genres and musical styles. We have a very open aesthetic that fuses Jazz, Contemporary music, European academic music, Venezuelan and Latin American, flamenco and World Music, always with an original approach.

 

(GF) New projects?

(SP-M) We have finished recording our second album, short before moving to Madrid. We are very excited about it and we hope that it will be as well reviewed as the first one: "The Temple of Ideas". Our   new album,    like the previous one, was entirely produced by us, and consists of seven original songs written by me and Angelo.

We go deeper exploring our flamenco inheritance and Mediterranean sounds, among others influences. Our main project now is to establish ourselves in Madrid. Although we knew it would not be easy, it   was a step    that we felt we had to take in order to continue growing as humans and artists. We also want to assemble the ensemble again in Europe with some of our previous members. We´ll see.    

Written by Geisa Fernandes - Brasil / Rio de Janeiro

The repertoire of this jazz singer and awarded songwriter from Rio de Janeiro reveals influences of Brazilian popular music, the French chanson and Latin American rhythms, but most of all, Geisa Fernandes is a jazz singer. Billie Holiday aficionada (back in college folks used to call her "Lady Doc"), this PhD holder and Comics researcher was a former vocalist of several bands in São Paulo. 

Hire Geisa to review your band or your new album.

For more info feel free to Contact Us

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